Buckets come in all sorts of sizes, shapes, many with different intended uses.  Hands-down, the coolest bucket that I know of has to be of the Ford T-Bucket variety.  These highly modified cars tend to only loosely resemble the original car that motivated their creation, and they all stand out as unique and personal expressions of a deep passion and love for this genre of car hobbyist.  In today’s post we’re kicking off a brand new photoblog series “Warmlands Show n Shine 2014” where we will feature photographs we captured at the recent car show here in Duncan.

Classic Ford Hot Rod - "Ford T Bucket" - Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Classic Ford Hot Rod – “Ford T Bucket” – Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada –

The old adage, “they just don’t make ’em like that anymore!” couldn’t be more true than it is for this generation of car.  Simple sheet metal graces the car, with the basic premise being to create a fundamental cover for the underlying mechanics that comprise the incredible hot rod.  The results are beautiful and totally unique lines that are distinctly a byproduct of this era.

With this particular Ford T Bucket we’ve got some of the key features at work here.  Immediately evident are the dual 4 barrel carbs sitting proudly atop a very serious looking tunnel-ram intake manifold, and the protruding air snorkel that is designed to suck in as much air as possible to feed the hungry small block V8 that sits between the rails making up the frame.  You’ll also note the chrome side exit exhaust pipes and the bona fide moon dish wheel covers, both very authentic to the time period when these beasts roamed and owned the streets that they prowled on.

Classic Ford Hot Rod - "Ford T Bucket" - Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Classic Ford Hot Rod – “Ford T Bucket” – Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada –

A pair of Holley carburetors sit on the manifold, a favorite of hot rodders for generations.  They are easy to install and tune, and are readily available at both auto wreckers and car parts shops all across the country.  The tunnel-ram manifold is a precursor to the more contemporary forced induction systems, and was designed to fill the combustion chambers with the largest charge of fuel and air possible.  This, my friends, translates directly to power.  And in a minimalistic car like this, that power would be amazing to experience first-hand.

Classic Ford Hot Rod - "Ford T Bucket" - Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Classic Ford Hot Rod – “Ford T Bucket” – Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada –

The interiors of these cars are spared nothing, and although they maintain that historic link to the minimalism that was so evident in cars of this generation, they also exhibit a personal interpretation of the car based on the owner’s tastes.  The features may be limited here with a distinct absence of stereo system, navigation accoutrements and the obvious lack of both air conditioning and a heater.  That’s OK, these cars are never meant to be driven in the heart of winter, and if you are lucky enough to find yourself cruising the streets in one in the summer you will enjoy the connection to the outdoors in the open cockpit.  Entertainment is always just a press of the gas pedal away and you really need nothing else to enjoy the full experience.

Classic Ford Hot Rod - "Ford T Bucket" - Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Classic Ford Hot Rod – “Ford T Bucket” – Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada –

This is the view that many see.  And frequently for a very short period of time.  Once again from this perspective we enjoy the simplicity of the car’s design.  Coach lights add a period-correct feel to the car and the wide back tires are supposed to try and tame all the power created by the fire-breathing V8, turning it all into forward momentum and broad smiles on the faces of those lucky enough to be careening down the roadway in style.

We’ve got an incredible catalog of photographs we’ll be featuring on our blog here in the coming months from the big car show, so if you are a fan of these beauties please do stay tuned.  For further fun, check out this page that features a great list of Hot Rod Slang terms, sure to keep the budding rodder entertained for quite some time.

Many thanks for popping on by today, we really appreciate your visit and we hope you’ve enjoyed this trek down memory lane with us here!  As always, we love to hear from all our visitors so please feel free to leave us any comments you may have below!
Search Advertising sign up page




  1. avatar Jimi Jones says:

    Man how I love these old classic. You’ve capture this beauty perfectly, Toad! That engine build is out of this world. Awesome!

    I just posted a ’40 Ford Coupe. Swing by when time allows. 😉

    • I absolutely will, my good friend! Thanks so much for your kind visit and most wonderful comments here, Jimi, it’s always a big highlight for us when you pop by to see us here!

  2. avatar Lisa Gordon says:

    My goodness, this is gorgeous, and that engine truly leaves me speechless.
    I am very much looking forward to seeing more of these beauties!

  3. avatar Rachel Cohen says:

    Brilliant Toad! Those are some might hot cars! 🙂

  4. avatar Len Saltiel says:

    What a cool looking ride Toad. You are right, they don’t make them like this anymore which is why they must be preserved whenever possible.

  5. avatar Edith Levy says:

    These are so cool Toad. You’re right they certainly don’t make them like that anymore.

  6. avatar Jim Nix says:

    I can imagine the fun you had shooting these Toad! nice work!

  7. avatar milton says:

    hi
    thank you for the story on my car very well done.

    milton mitchell