The more I learn about people from previous generations and the hardships and experiences they had, the more I respect and admire them.  I think this is a large reason for the inherent interest we all find in visiting our local museums and viewing and learning about our history.  Nothing can put you directly in touch with our forefathers than spending time with the items they once owned and used.

Today’s post finds us back at the Metchosin Pioneer Museum looking at a few artifacts.  We had the pleasure and honor of spending an entire afternoon exploring the museum due to our best friends (The Mudpuppies) Dad who curates this awesome place.  This post is a continuation of our long running series “The Antiques Toad Show“, which features the items we photographed that day and discusses their history.

Lantern - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Lantern - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

It may be tempting to break into a rendition of “You Light Up My Life” here, but I am quite sure that no one wants to hear an out-of-key Toad wailing, so we’ll save you that torture.  With that being the case, I have to admit that this item really captivated my imagination.  There’s just something about an antique lantern that takes us all right back to “Little House on the Prairie”.  This particular item is still in rather wonderful condition, and displays all of it’s character with a lot of gusto.  Who owned this?  What was their story?  You can easily picture a pioneer woman standing on her stoop with lantern in hand, signalling home to her husband who is coming in late from the fields.  Today, we flick a switch and the entire house lights up, but 100 years ago no such luxuries existed.

Candy Tin - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Candy Tin - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

The Metchosin Pioneer Museum is perfectly setup to exemplify the tastes, decorations and setup of homes from this period.  I am sure this old candy tin looks familiar to a lot of people.  When I was a tadpole growing up, my mom used to buy me this toffee as a treat sometimes, but for me it was in a small, square cardboard container.  The container may have changed over the years, but the familiarity of the brand remains, that’s for sure.

Butter Churn - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Butter Churn - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

I believe this is an old-fashioned butter churn.  Please, do correct me if I am wrong.  Maybe it’s an old whiskey barrel, but there was nary a pirate to be found in the vicinity so we went with our butter churn idea instead.  Today to get butter, we all just head to the supermarket and open the fridge door to grab a pound.  Not so much 100 years ago; butter was hand-churned.  It was a huge labor, but I imagine the taste of fresh, pure farm butter must have truly been quite the thing.

Old Fashioned Display - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Old Fashioned Display - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

This little shelf was on display in the little girls bedroom of the museum.  Faithfully setup to reproduce a room from this era, items like this add so much authenticity to the display.

Storage Trunk - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Storage Trunk - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Storage Trunk - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

Storage Trunk - Metchosin Pioneer Museum, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada

With our recent work with TLC The Land Conservancy of BC, we have become acutely aware of the perils, dangers and challenges that our earliest settlers went through to bring themselves and their family to the “new world” to settle and find a better life.  Many trunks like these were used to carry their valuables and items across vast oceans as they traveled to the new land.  Each wear mark, each sticker or notation, is a personal mark much like the energy the people left behind in these objects.

It’s truly important not to ever forget this indelible imprint that has been left behind.  These folks toiled with their very blood and sweat to create this place we all now call home.  The world they created is truly a marvel, and we really believe in the importance of preserving these memories for all future generations to enjoy as well.

Thanks so much for your kind visit today, it really means a lot to us.  Please, as always we encourage all our visitors to leave us any comments you may have as we really love to hear from everyone.




  1. avatar Jerry Denham says:

    That trunk is very neat. You always find some of the neatest nostalgic items Toad.

  2. avatar Jim Denham says:

    LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the lantern and the shelf the tin lives on – absolutely wonderful! Another great post my friend!

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Thank you so so much Jim! That truly is so kind of you to say, my friend, thank you!

  3. avatar Heather says:

    1. I want every single one of the books on that bookcase. 2. I will take the storage trunk too.

    *sigh* I love old things 🙂

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      We share this love, Heather. 🙂 Thank you ever so kindly my friend, your support and encouragement is something we really appreciate.

  4. avatar Adam Allegro says:

    Some awesome treasures. History has always fascinated me. Especially having the opportunity to experience some of the wonders of Europe, specifically Italy. It is just amazing. Another enjoyable, well written, well photographed post my friend 🙂

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Thanks so much Adam! I can just imagine what you’ve got to explore in Europe there, society is so much older than it is here. It’s just so much fun to get a chance to document these items and share them with everyone here. Thanks for your visit and support my friend!

  5. avatar Rich McPeek says:

    Terrific write up and awesome shots as usual Toad! Wonderful work! Have a great weekend!

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Thank you kindly, good sir! We truly appreciate your support here, Rich!

  6. avatar Len Saltiel says:

    I really love that trunk Toad. Awesome details and textures (the other images are top notch too). Your comment about early settlers rings true to me as I thought the same thing when I was in the American Southwest. I wonder how many of us would have survived in the same situations. Have a great weekend.

  7. avatar Edith Levy says:

    I love this series Toad. You’ve done a wonderful job of bringing these items to life through your images.

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Thank you ever so kindly, Edith, your support and encouragement means an awful lot to us here!

  8. avatar Rob says:

    Wonderful series and treasures!

    What is it about lanterns that thrill us? Perhaps it is that distant memory, the droning hiss from the mantles, the over the top bright white light and the smell of spent fuel. I always thing about deer camp back in my youth.

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      I just love your thoughts here, Rob, thanks SO much for taking the time to pop by and leave these wonderful comments for everyone to enjoy like this!

  9. These are absolutly treasures. And I like how you have photographed them, with some atmosphere.

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Thank you so very kindly, Bente, that really means a lot to us! We really appreciate your visit and wonderful comments, thank you!

  10. avatar Jim Nix says:

    great finds Toad, well shot and processed too!

  11. avatar LensScaper says:

    Respect and Admiration indeed for our ancestors. When you look at some of the extraordinary buildings they constructed with very primitive tools you realize how incredibly clever they were. Even in something simple like that Hurricane Lamp there’s some clever metalworking and glass blowing going on.

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Well said, Andy, we totally agree with you here! Since we’ve started to document things like this, that realization of the amount of thought and energy that goes into designing things like this becomes very evident. It’s been a real eye-opener for us up here, that’s for sure. Many, many thanks for your kind visit and support, my friend!! 🙂

  12. avatar Lisa Gordon says:

    Absolute treasures, and truly magnificent images.

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Thank you so, so much, Lisa! We really do appreciate your visit and kind comments! 🙂

  13. Lovely set of images, close-ups work really well.

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Thank you so very much, Mark, that means an awful lot to us coming from you my friend!

  14. avatar Adam Allegro says:

    Treasures indeed!! Something about those old chests gets me. So awesome. Another nice smattering of awesomness Toad 🙂

    • avatar ToadHollowPhoto says:

      Wonderful comments here, Adam, how can we begin to thank you for taking the time to pop by and leave these for us! We really appreciate all your support, my friend!